At  first you might look at the prices for soft body armor and think “why so expensive?” The answer is “bleeding out will cost you a lot more.”

Let’s take a quick look at where soft body armor came from. Early versions used silk or cotton as the main material. You might laugh, but the proper amount of layering and weaving, coupled with the low-muzzle velocity of the projectiles at the time, made them surprisingly effective and a first step toward what we have today.

Modern soft body armor took a huge step forward around 1971 when Kevlar was invented. Kevlar is a synthetic fiber that’s five time stronger than steel, and objectively saved thousands of lives. Over the years many more types of fiber have been developed, the constant goal to make it stronger, lighter, and more durable.

Soft body armor of today is so prized because of it’s benefit to weight ratio. This affords you protection from most handgun rounds while still being low-profile, low-heat, and lightweight. Weight and heat-dispersal have been found to be one of the most important aspects of body armor, as people are more likely to wear it if it’s comfortable.

Most commercial soft body armor is rated at Level IIIA. This will stop nearly every handgun on the market and is rated to take multiple hits from a .357 sig or a 6” barrel .44 mag. So you’re protected from what you’re most likely to run into on the street, 9mm and .45 ACP.

The soft body armor we sell is rated as Level IIIA. It is excellent for covert work, when you need the protection but don’t want to clue someone in on the fact that you might soon be in need of it. Remember, though, that when you’re taking rifle fire soft armor isn’t going to cut it. You’ll need to supplement it with plated armor to save your hide then.

In the end, getting shot while wearing tactical soft body armor will give you a heck of a bruise. But when you compare that to a sucking chest wound, you’ll thank yourself that you bought it.